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CSA, Ski Jumping Canada again criticize 2010 Olympic lawsuit

The recent announcement by Canadian ski jumper Zoya Lynch that she is joining a lawsuit against the Vancouver Olympic Organizing Committee (VANOC) that seeks to include women’s jumping in the 2010 sports program has drawn criticism from the Canadian Snowsports Association (CSA) and Ski Jumping Canada.
THE RECENT announcement by Canadian ski jumper Zoya Lynch that she is joining a lawsuit against the Vancouver Olympic Organizing Committee (VANOC) that seeks to include women’s jumping in the 2010 sports program has drawn criticism from the Canadian Snowsports Association (CSA) and Ski Jumping Canada.
    Dave Pym, the managing director of CSA, says the lawsuit “at best is a nuisance and at worst is a diversion that could impact on our preparations” for the 2010 Games.
    “Although we have always understood the frustration of the entire Canadian sports community and in particular those directly impacted by the decision of the IOC to deny the inclusion of ladies ski jumping in the program of 2010, we must again emphasize that any action directed at VANOC is inappropriate and in our opinion badly misguided," Pym says. “VANOC was tremendously supportive of the CSA attempts over the past few years to actively lobby the IOC for inclusion of ladies ski jumping, but VANOC is not the decision makers as to the inclusion of events. This lawsuit is being led by others outside of Canada who should know and in fact do know that VANOC has no authority to add events and that the decision was that of the
IOC and one can only conclude is an attempt to embarrass all of us as we move toward 2010.”
     The CSA’s membership includes Alpine Canada, Cross Country Canada, Canadian Snowboard Federation, Canadian Freestyle Ski, Telemark Canada, Speed Ski Canada, Canadian Association of Disabled Skiers, Nordic Combined and Ski jump Canada.

     CSA President Chris Robinson added that he believes the lawsuit against VANOC can only damage relations between the CSA and the organizing committee. 
    "The politics of this issue goes far beyond Canadian borders. The CSA has been instrumental in moving ladies ski jumping forward internationally and at the World Cup level through its efforts and influence with the International Ski Federation,” Robinson says.
    “We must continue to use the FIS channels to lobby the IOC for acceptance of ladies ski jumping into the Olympic Games. VANOC has been a supporter of the CSA position but their ability to  influence this decision has passed. Accordingly, we must now focus on the 2014 Olympics in Sochi, Russia, as the goal for ladies ski jumping and put a disappointing situation with 2010 Games behind us. This action is not supported by the CSA, its members and in particular is not supported by Ski Jumping Canada.”
    Ski Jumping Canada Chairman Brent Morrice affirmed that “Ski Jumping Canada does
not believe that suing VANOC will accomplish our goal to have the women participate in
the Olympics Games.” Morrice added that VANOC has hosted the women jumpers at the new Olympic facility in the Callaghan Valley and are planning to do so again in December in a continued attempt to further develop the women’s circuit internationally.
    “Helping these athletes with continued training and high performance funding will assure
that when this event is added to the Olympic program, we will as a nation, have medal
contenders in the Olympic ski jumping event,” Morrice says.

    — CSA press release material 

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