Thursday, October 22, 2020

Radamus: The American development system

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The most underutilized resources in the United States’ ski racing system are the colleges and universities.

Navigating development: How to overcome the ultimate Canadian dilemma

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In the mid 1970s, CBC journalist David Ritchie penned a book, “Ski the Canadian Way,” along with chapter contributions from notable athletes his brother, John, was coaching at the time: Ken Read, Steve Podborski, Dave Irwin and Dave Murray. You read that correctly — the Crazy Canucks.

Taylor: Fall matters more than ever — make it count!

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It’s hard to believe the summer, what I consider Phase I of the ski racing prep period, is over. This summer...

Pritchard: Some of my favorite movements for the alpine athlete

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It's important to remember that athletics often require an array of strength, power, mobility and stability across multiple planes of motion. Often times we can get carried away with the weight on the bar or the speed at which we are training but neglect which direction we are going.

Rokos: Where do we come from? What are we? Where are we going?

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University of Colorado coach Richard Rokos chimes in with some words of wisdom about the upcoming season. Things aren't as bad as they look on the surface, he says. We can make the best of this!

Radamus: Competition raises effort and pushes personal limits

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The issue is not that there are not enough opportunities for athletes to receive comprehensive and professional training and coaching; the issue is there are too many.

Taylor: What prevents mental training from being a key part of ski racing development

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Mental training, traditionally called sport psychology, can suffer from ‘guilt by association’ with the broader field of clinical psychology that still carries the stigma that only screwed-up people seek professional help. This perception, however inaccurate it is, can prevent athletes, coaches, and parents from seeing mental preparation for what it is.

Gundersen: Junior development (Part 2) — alpine skiing

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In Junior Development Part 1 – Lessons from Soccer, a look inside the Philadelphia Union and its Union Academy, I described...

Costa: COVID-19 is the largest injury risk ever posed to skiers

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A combination of risk factors including high skiing speed, athlete strength, equipment, snow conditions, course/terrain changes, and the risk-consuming attitudes of a skier makes skiing one of the most dangerous sports.

Taylor: Mental preparation is a missing piece of the ski racing puzzle

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Consider the vital importance of the mind in ski racing. Motivation, confidence, intensity, focus, emotions, resilience, adaptability, patience, perseverance, coachability, attitude, collaboration, the list goes on. Yes, these mental “muscles” can develop on their own with individual athletes.

Dwyer: It’s not about tech vs speed

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In his second contribution to our ongoing development series, veteran coach Kirk Dwyer addresses the evolution of sport and the emphasis on tech and speed in alpine development.

Gundersen: Junior development (Part 1) — lessons from soccer

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Industry expert Finn Gundersen, previously headmaster at Burke Mountain Academy, draws comparisons with junior soccer development and outlines lessons that can be applied to alpine ski racing. First in a two-part series.

Radamus: Let’s face it, skiing is expensive

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In his second contribution to our ongoing development series, longtime coach Aldo Radamus takes on the elephant in the room: cost.

Feehan: You can’t simply copy-paste the Norwegian sport model

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Former SRM Editor-in-Chief C.J. Feehan shares some insight from her experience living and coaching in Norway — a nation whose sport model is regarded as one of the best in the world and won’t easily be replicated.

Dwyer: The golden age of skill development

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All of the greats have one thing in common: a lot of time on snow during the golden age of skill development, which is roughly from age eight to puberty for girls and nine to puberty for boys.

Radamus: Reflections on alpine ski racing development in the United States

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There is no question that the United States should have a welcoming, affordable, fulfilling and growing sport system and expect to consistently field one of the most competitive and deepest national teams in the world. Why, then, is this not always the case?

Morgan: Nail the free stuff

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Reading through the recent round of articles, letters and comments related to the friction between USSS and NCAA skiing, the phrase that keeps coming to mind is “Same team! Same team!”

Rokos: The problem with the US Ski Team and college

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College programs operate with solid financial resources and typically excellent facilities, staff and support systems, thanks to the presence of collegiate funding. For the NGB, this is an opportunity to broaden the developmental base.

Mangan: On or off the team, ideas for the future

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Strengthening and supporting our college programs benefit the development of our national teams. Or so one would think.

Haber: My favorite American performances of the 21st Century

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From Daron Rahlves and Lindsey Vonn to Mikaela Shiffrin and Tommy Ford.

Taylor: Use the COVID-19 crisis to become a better ski racer

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Let me begin with a question: What does the COVID-19 crisis have in common with a ski race?

My retirement story: It’s not always easy

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Hanging up the race skis is an inevitable point in any skiing career.

Taylor: Ski racing meets COVID-19: what to say, what to do

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We humans don’t like disruptions in our lives. We like to feel safe, secure, and comfortable. That’s not necessarily a bad thing; in fact,...

Taylor: How to keep your physical and mental mojo all season long

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Consistency is particularly hard during the long and exhausting season. Travel, cold weather, intense training, a lot of races, and having to balance school, friends, and ski racing can just plain wear you down.
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